About the C.D. Howe Institute

The C.D. Howe Institute is an independent not-for-profit research institute whose mission is to raise living standards by fostering economically sound public policies. Widely considered to be Canada's most influential think tank, the Institute is a trusted source of essential policy intelligence, distinguished by research that is nonpartisan, evidence-based and subject to definitive expert review.

Get the App

Op-Eds

Share

24 Mar 2017
Mar
24
Alberta and Saskatchewan have budget problems. And they’ve had them for decades. Easy money from resource revenues provided roughly one-quarter of all provincial revenue only a few short years ago. The collapse in oil prices, which aren’t expected to rise any time soon, revealed each province’s shaky budget foundations for all to see. Though they face similar challenges, their responses are anything but. In Alberta, budget debates are highly polarized. Spending restraint is unacceptable slash-and-burn to some, while to others tax increases are nefarious socialist plots (we exaggerate; but only a little). Neither position is particularly sensible. Alberta has one of the highest levels of spending, per person, yet the...
01 Mar 2017
Mar
01
You have probably heard of bitcoin. You might have even heard about its underlying technology, the blockchain. What you may not have realized is that it is not bitcoin that will change our lives, but other applications of blockchain technology in areas such as payments, contracts and the provision of government services. Blockchain technology in its simplest form allows transactions to occur between individuals and institutions without the need for a third party. This would entail a big change for financial services firms. Since the Renaissance period, they have relied on a double-entry bookkeeping system whereby each transaction requires a debit on the asset side and a credit on the liability side. This form of record-keeping has...
22 Feb 2017
Feb
22
No one likes the word deficit. In government finance it means you spend more than what you raise in revenue. And in trade it means you import more than you export. U.S. President Donald Trump has repeatedly pointed to widening trade deficits with countries such as China and Mexico as proof positive that his predecessors have made bad trade deals. But it is misleading to think of trade deficits in that way. At the very least, the reality is far more nuanced. First, imports have a beneficial impact. More countries selling to the U.S., or Canada, means more affordable goods for consumers, which has helped boost what’s called the “C” variable — consumer spending. In the U.S., in fact, if we remove food and energy from the equation,...

Connect with Us

© 2014 C.D. Howe Institute. All Rights Reserved.

Connect with Us

© 2014 C.D. Howe Institute. All Rights Reserved.